Response from the Metareilá Association to Suruí leaders’ call to stop the forest carbon project: “A deplorable smear campaign”

The controversy surrounding the Suruí Forest Carbon Project in Brazil continues. In January 2015, leaders of the Paiter-Suruí wrote a “Note of Clarification” in which they called for the end of the project. The Metareilá Association, the organisation that runs the Suruí Forest Carbon Project, has now responded with a defence of the project.

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Response from Steve Zwick, Ecosystem Marketplace, to CIMI’s interview with Henrique Suruí: “Indigenous Leaders Call Foul On Once-Revered Catholic Organization”

On 17 December 2014, REDD-Monitor posted an interview with Henrique Suruí about the Paiter-Suruí REDD project in Brazil. The interview was carried out by CIMI, the Indigenous Missionary Council, and was first published in the most recent issue of its magazine, Porantim.

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REDD on trial: “As long as nature is seen as property in law, there can be no justice for communities, the climate or nature”

2014-12-11-151422_1131x978_scrotThe International Tribunal for the Rights of Nature took place on 5 and 6 December 2014 in Lima. On trial were corporations, the United Nations, and government. Cases included mining in Peru and Ecuador, oil extraction in Ecuador, the Belo Monte dam in Brazil, fracking in Bolivia and the USA, BP’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill, damage to the Australian Barrier Reef. And REDD.

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AIDESEP and Rainforest Foundation Norway warn that Peru must improve policy on forests and indigenous peoples

peruOn 23 September 2014, Peru and Norway signed an agreement to reduce deforestation. AIDESEP, the main organization for the indigenous peoples of the Peruvian Amazon, and Rainforest Foundation Norway welcome the deal, but warn that Peru must improve its “policy and practices on forests and indigenous peoples’ rights”.

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World Bank project failed to protect Sengwer indigenous rights. Bank now promises to help “find a lasting, peaceful resolution to this long unfinished business of land rights in Kenya”

Last week, the World Bank’s board met to make a decision on an Inspection Panel report about a Bank project in Kenya. The Inspection Panel’s report accused the Bank of failing to protect the rights of the Sengwer forest indigenous community.

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