REDD myth no 3: To address climate change we have to reduce emissions from deforestation

Brazil forest fire“We have to reduce emissions from deforestation if we’re to prevent catastrophic climate change,” WWF argues on its website. At a first glance, it seems like a no-brainer. Forests store an awful lot of carbon. When forests are cleared for cattle ranching, or to make way for oil palm plantations, the carbon dioxide goes back into the atmosphere.

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“Insufficient attention to industrial logging”: Environmental Investigation Agency’s comments on DR Congo’s Emissions Reduction Programme Document

2016-03-10-143804_1680x1050_scrotIn mid-January 2016, the Democratic Republic of Congo submitted its revised Emission Reductions Programme Document (ER-PD) to the Carbon Fund of the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility. The Environmental Investigation Agency has produced a report of “preliminary comments” on the ER-PD.

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Response from Siti Nurbaya, Indonesia’s Minister of Environment and Forestry: The Norwegian Government has apologised for its environment minister’s statement about “slow progress” on deforestation

IndonesiaTwo days ago, REDD-Monitor wrote a post about a trip to Indonesia by Norway’s climate and environment minister, Vidar Helgesen. The trip took place in early February 2016, and Pilita Clark, a Financial Times journalist, accompanied Helgesen on his trip. In her article, Clark quoted Helgesen as saying, “We would obviously have hoped things would have progressed more quickly. We haven’t seen actual progress in reducing deforestation.”

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Deforestation is increasing in the Mai Ndombe REDD project area. And the project still sells carbon credits

2016-02-18-151642_1680x1026_scrotThe Mai Ndombe REDD project in the Democratic Republic of Congo covers about 300,000 hectares of forest. Project documents claim that without the project, the forest would be logged, and that communities in the area benefit from the project. A new article by Jutta Kill in the World Rainforest Movement Bulletin questions both of these claims.

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