Guest Post: TAMS – Failed experiments with carbon in Madagascar

In 2016, Sara Peña Valderrama completed her PhD in social anthropology, where she studied a forest carbon project run by Conservation International in Madagascar. Her thesis is available on Durham University’s website: Entangling Molecules: an ethnography of a carbon offset project in Madagascar’s eastern rainforest. She submitted this Guest Post about what happened when the project changed to a carbon project. She is currently a Honorary Research Associate at Durham University.

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Carbon markets are not providing “long-term, scaled-up, predictable, new and additional finance”

Two stories about the current failure of carbon trading as a way of raising money to address climate change: First, the Adaptation Fund, which has seen its income from a tax on carbon credits dry up; Second, an exchange between Conservation International and the World Bank, which are both pro-carbon trading, but only one seems to realise that the markets have collapsed.

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Conservation International, illegal logging and corruption in the Cardamoms, Cambodia

The Phnom Penh Post has published another article in its investigation into corruption and illegal logging on a Conservation International project: “Rangers paid by an internationally funded conservation organisation have been directly profiting for years from the very trade they are supposed to be preventing in southwest Cambodia.”

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Conservation International turns a blind eye to illegal logging in the Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia

Conservation InternationalLast month, the Phnom Penh Post published a shocking article about the illegal logging of rosewood in the Central Cardamom Protected Forest in Cambodia. According to the article, the illegal logging is abetted by military personnel, while Conservation International, which is working with the Cambodian government to manage the protected area, denies that the trade is taking place.

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A very different kind of Walt Disney production: Conservation International’s REDD project in the Democratic Republic of Congo

“We believe that the current situation demonstrates more than ever the need to pursue other paths beyond REDD+.” This is from this month’s issue of the World Rainforest Movement Bulletin, which focusses on REDD. The first article in the Bulletin asks “Can REDD+ be ‘fixed’?”, the answer to which is somewhat given away by the next article: “The ‘sins’ of the REDD+ approach”.

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