Guest Post: Oddar Meanchey communities “have long been abandoned”. The Fern report correctly raises a number of difficulties and challenges with carbon offsetting generally and REDD+ in particular

Dr Tim Frewer carried out part of the research for his PhD thesis in Cambodia, looking at the Oddar Meanchey REDD project. Following the responses from Terra Global Capital and VCS to Fern’s recent critical report that featured a case study of the Oddar Meanchey project, Frewer sent the following Guest Post to REDD-Monitor.

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Responses from Terra Global Capital, VCS, and Wildlife Works to Fern’s report, “Unearned credit: Why aviation industry forest offsets are doomed to fail”

In November 2017, Fern published a report titled, “Unearned credit: Why aviation industry forest offsets are doomed to fail”. The report takes aim at the aviation industry’s planned carbon trading mechanism, the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation.

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Virgin Atlantic has stopped buying carbon credits from the Oddar Meanchey REDD project

On 9 January 2018, Virgin Atlantic told the Phnom Penh Post that it had stopped buying carbon credits from the Oddar Meanchey REDD project in Cambodia. Virgin Atlantic’s decision followed the publication of a report by Fern that highlights the problems of offsetting emissions from the aviation sector. One of the case studies in the report was Oddar Meanchey.

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The Suruí Forest Carbon Project faces illegal logging, gold and diamond mining. Almir Suruí is looking for alternatives to carbon

The Suruí Forest Carbon Project was the first REDD project to be developed and run by indigenous people. The Suruí’s Seventh of September territory covers an area of 248,000 hectares on the border of the states of Rondônia and Mato Grosso. The chief of the Suruí, Almir Suruí, has been lauded internationally for his role in promoting the project. He’s been called the Gandhi of the Amazon. In 2013, he won a UN Forest Hero Award.

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Why are environmental NGOs siding with the oil industry in support of cap-and-trade in California? Especially when a huge coalition of environmental justice and climate groups opposes it?

California’s Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) expires in 2020. What will replace it is the subject of intense debate in California. In recent weeks Governor Jerry Brown brought the oil industry to the negotiating table. And earlier this week, Brown and supporting legislators introduced their proposals, based on the oil industry’s wish list: AB 398 and AB 617.

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